EN
EN

RUNNING ON A TREADMILL: WHY IT'S DIFFERENT

Training on a moving surface can be destabilising for a runner. Unlike when running outdoors, you'll have to adapt your stride. The moving surface means you have to bring your feet down faster. As a result, the propulsion phase is shortened. This unnatural movement affects how your muscles work: on a treadmill, your hamstrings don't work as much, while the hip flexor muscles (iliacus and psoas) compensate for this and work harder.

RUNNING ON A TREADMILL: WHAT ARE THE PERKS?

RUNNING ON A TREADMILL: 6 GOOD REASONS TO TRY IT

- Ease of use: a treadmill can be a practical option in addition to or instead of running outdoors. There's always a good reason to run, even if you have to do it differently!

- When running on a treadmill, you can simulate natural running movements and work your cardiorespiratory system in a similar way.

- The console lets you track maximum stats: heart rate, speed, time, distance and more.

- Training on a treadmill can help you keep a consistent pace and give you a good aerobic workout.

- Many treadmills offer a range of training programmes. Just follow along to achieve your running goals.

- Running on a treadmill is a great way to avoid the drawbacks of running outdoors: bad weather, darkness, traffic, unsafe conditions, etc.

- Contrary to running on tarmac, a treadmill is easier on the joints. It offers softer cushioning to protect your body from the impact of running.

 

 

BASIC TREADMILL WORKOUT PROGRAMME

To improve your endurance, you can do this basic treadmill workout at least twice a week.

 

BASIC WORKOUT FOR 40 TO 60 MINUTES

- 10-15 min: warm up by walking or slowly jogging

- 25-35 min: run at a consistent pace (around 70% of your maximum heart rate)

- 5-10 min: cool down by walking quickly or slowly jogging

 

VARIATIONS

- Gradually extend the time you run

- Shorten your warm-up to 5-10 min

- Increase your running pace

- Do intervals during your run time: Alternate 6 to 12 intervals of 30 to 60 seconds by varying your running speed (walk or jog / moderate or fast = faster than your usual running pace)

- Gradually increase the number of intervals you do

 

These variations will help you increase your endurance little by little and extend the time you're able to run.

 

REGULAR BREATHING

Inhale through your nose and exhale through your mouth; your inhale and exhale should be the same length. If you start to get side stitches, lengthen your exhale.

 

SAFETY RECOMMENDATIONS

Stand between the two handrails. When running, you should land on the forefoot to better absorb the shock and prevent knee and back pain. Imagine you're "scratching" the ground to bring your hips forward. Unlike when walking, you want to avoid landing heel first. Drink small sips of water every 10 to 15 minutes.

ADD TO YOUR CROSS TRAINER WORKOUTS

The principle is simple: change up the difficulty by doing intervals. Alternate pedalling resistance levels to change up the intensity.

Don't forget to start your workout with a warm-up of 5 to 7 minutes.

WORKOUT:

- 5 minutes: warm-up

- 3 minutes: First interval at maximum speed

- 2 minutes: recovery

- 5 minutes: Second interval: alternate between fast pedalling at high resistance and slow pedalling at low resistance. Repeat this interval twice.

- 5 minutes: Third interval: backpedalling. Alternate fast pedalling at high resistance and slow pedalling at low resistance. Repeat this interval twice.

- 3 minutes: recovery while backpedalling at low resistance

RUNNING ON A TREADMILL: WHAT ARE THE PERKS?

CHECK OUT OUR SELECTION OF TIPS